Top Radical & Progressive Events Of The 19th Century: Part 2

This is the second of two posts on the ‘Top Progressive Moments of the 19th Century’ in the UK. You can read the first part here.

 

7. Publication of ‘On Liberty’ (1859)

John Stuart Mill - On Liberty

Described as the most influential English-speaking philosopher of the 19th century, John Stuart Mill was a proponent of the ethical system of utilitarianism, which proposed a social system that prioritised maximising people’s happiness and reducing human suffering. In his work ‘On Liberty’, Mill emphasised the importance of individuality and discussed the dangers of a ‘tyranny of the majority’. It was an influential work, forming the basis of liberal political thought, and has remained in print continuously since its original publication.

 

6. Release of the Tolpuddle Martyrs (1836)

Tolpuddle Martyrs
Contemporary illustration of five of the six Tolpuddle martyrs

In 1832, six men from Tolpuddle in Dorset founded the ‘Friendly Society of Agricultural Labourers’, which was in effect a trade union. They were protesting the reduction in agricultural wages brought about by increasing mechanisation. Although technically trade unions were no longer illegal following the repeal of the Combination Acts in 1825, an obscure 1797 law banning people from swearing oaths to each other meant that the men were prosecuted and sentenced to transportation to Australia. The ‘Tolpuddle Martyrs’ were freed in 1836 following a mass political march and petition, and the support of Home Secretary John Russell.  Continue reading “Top Radical & Progressive Events Of The 19th Century: Part 2”

Advertisements

Top Radical & Progressive Events Of The 19th Century: Part 1

15. Establishment of the Rochdale Society of Equitable Pioneers (1844)

Toad Lane store
Toad Lane – the Pioneers’ cooperative store

The modern British cooperative movement traces its roots to the foundation of this Rochdale society, one of the first consumer cooperatives. The ‘Rochdale Principles’ were written by the society as a set of ideals that of form the basis of cooperative movements to this day. The 19th century movement was backed by progressive industrialists such as Robert Owen, who believed in providing good working conditions and education for the families of his employees.

 

14. Chartist Demonstration in London (1848)

The 1848 Chartist meeting on Kennington Common
The 1848 Chartist meeting on Kennington Common

The Chartist political reform movement had delivered several petitions to parliament following publication of the People’s Charter in 1838 (see below), but by far the biggest was in 1848 as part of a demonstration in London. Tens of thousands of workers gathered on Kennington Common in the biggest call for political reform – universal suffrage, payment of MPs and equal-sized constituencies, among other demands – to date. Continue reading “Top Radical & Progressive Events Of The 19th Century: Part 1”

Beyond Drying Up: Six (Conventional) Uses for a Tea Towel

In the age of the dishwasher, there are a few misguided people who feel that tea towels are no longer necessary in the kitchen. Be warned to stay clear of such heresy! Tea towels don’t have to be used for drying the dishes alone: they have several other vital functions in the modern kitchen. In this post we review a few of the traditional uses for this most flexible of kitchen accessories beyond drying up (a future post will expose some of the more ‘alternative’ functions!).

 

1. To cover a warm loaf of bread

Tea towel wrapping bread

Or cake and other delicious and exposed home-made baked food! The tea towel’s rectangle shape and insulating cotton should provide the perfect covering for traditional English scones, jam and clotted cream.

 

2. To dry wet surfaces

Tea towel wiping surface

We all know things can get quite messy when cooking in the kitchen. You’ve just sprayed and wiped your hob and table surfaces, only to find that now they’re soaked with water and unusable for the next twenty minutes. Enter the tea towel to wipe off that excess water and move you quickly onto dessert! Continue reading “Beyond Drying Up: Six (Conventional) Uses for a Tea Towel”